Lighter Moments: Some Stunning Questions

Our 5-year-old Arian stunned me with his questions recently.

Our Chinese-English (or is it English-Chinese) boy!

Our Chinese-English (or is it English-Chinese) boy!

We had been trying to encourage him to speak Chinese because we have been told that being Chinese, it is important that we know our mother tongue. So, we felt a sense of success having managed to change his earlier proclamation

“I’m English!” to “I’m Chinese but I speak English!”

SO when he suddenly popped the question recently, I was lost for words.

“Mommy, I’m a Chinese boy right?”

“Yes, my darling, you are!”

“So why do I speak English?”

? ? ?

Here’s another one.

Another milestone achieved recently was his readiness to move into his own room. After having moved all his stuff out of my room, and finally enjoying our room to ourselves without the kids hanging around, our son came to me after a few days with this:

“Mummy, if a person loves another person, they should sleep together right?

“Er, as in husband and wife, like daddy and mummy?”

“No, as in I love you mummy, so I should sleep with you!”

! ! !

Our 5-year-old Arian stunned me with his questions recently.
We had been trying to encourage him to speak Chinese because we have been
told that being Chinese, it is important that we know our mother tongue. So,
we felt a sense of success having managed to change his earlier proclamation
“I’m English!” to “I’m Chinese but I speak English!”
SO when he suddenly popped the question recently, I was lost for words.
“Mommy, I’m a Chinese boy right?”
“Yes, my darling, you are!”
“So why do I speak English?”
? ? ?
Here’s another one.
Another milestone achieved recently was his readiness to move into his own
room. After having moved all his stuff out of my room, and finally enjoying
our room to ourselves without the kids hanging around, our son came to me
after a few days with this:
“Mummy, if a person loves another person, they should sleep together right?
“Er, as in husband and wife, like daddy and mummy?”
“No, as in I love you mummy, so I should sleep with you!”
! ! !
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3 Responses to Lighter Moments: Some Stunning Questions

  1. Sloane says:

    (a) Children don’t have a sense of racial-national identity :). Thus, language is for communication, not for identification or exclusivity. Not like in the “olden” days when speaking English you are called a “traitor” and “arrogant”.

    (b) Watch how Mother Cats tell their kittens, “It’s time you move into your own space”. Hahahahah. ……Pretty grim for a human parent to do that!

  2. chong wai leng says:

    Well, to the “old schooled” people, things have not changed in terms of mindset. So I still get frowns and admonitions from these well-meaning relatives for not teaching them Chinese. But the truth of the matter is, I do! But not the way it’s being done at schools using the drilling and punishment method. We try to make it fun and natural.

    Our contention for making English as our FIRST language rather than our second is that to be really good in this international language, that is so difficult to master and grasp by those learning it as a second language, we need to THINK in English. This way, we needn’t spend so much time and money trying to master it via private tuitions or expensive foreign programs. Then, at the right time, expose our children to their mother-tongue language, or any other languages for that matter, by immersing them in the environments that support the learning of the particular language.

  3. kevin says:

    I think in English som much so that I automatically use English with my boys since their birth. I had to struggle for a week to “recover” my Hakka in time for me to converse with my late grandmother when I came back from NZ after 2 years “holidaying” there.

    Now both boys only use English with us n a smattering of mandarin (with a Gwai-lo slang) with their maternal grandparents

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