What Would a ‘Slow Education Movement’ Look Like?

In our fast-speed world where the country’s advancement is measured by how fast its broadband internet speed is, and the measurement of IQ and exam grades are grave concerns of a national scale, what do our kids really need to “survive” in this rapidly changing environment? The answer may not go down well with many “experts” who rigorously market all kinds of educational programmes and packages to parents eager to have their kids prosperously prepared for the privileged few in a world of rapid riches and exclusive wealth. Nor would it make sense to those who have been systematically and skillfully programmed to think in subservient conformity.

But think we must! But not how to be like everyone else and live ordinary lives to be led by others who proclaim to be our leaders. We need to start thinking as leaders unto ourselves and to nurture future generations of thinking and caring individuals who have the greatest desire to give their best to the world.

And to do that, we have got to slow down and make every moment count. How we educate our young will determine the future world that they will inherit. There is wisdom in slowing down.

Here’s a very wise article on why and how we can all do that for ourselves and for our children!

May the Slow Force be with you!

“So what does the Slow Movement mean for education? It asks us to reimagine what it means to be a community of learners. It requires us to embrace the organic messiness of learning. It requires admitting that a large part of what is happening isn’t good for our children, our teachers, or our communities. Rather than a top down industrialized and homogenized assembly line, we need a grass roots Slow Education movement that takes into account what real learning looks like and why children really need to learn more slowly, freely and thoroughly.”

Read the rest of the article below
> http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/08/what-would-a-slow-education-movement-look-like/ >

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